What's new in the world of Moblty and smart store technology

Moblty Press & industry news

READ MORE

Moblty Helps Retailers Transform Everyday Shopping Experience

TRENTON, N.J. (January 24, 2018) – Understanding the needs of retailers to keep pace in a digital age, Livingston-based Moblty has developed what is emerging as a leading shopper marketing software platform, helping businesses digitize their footprint and enhance customers’ shopping experiences.

Through a unique suite of products and services, Moblty enables brands to offer customers digital shopping inside the brick-and-mortar store experience. Among other features, shoppers can use interactive in-store displays to swipe, click, and engage with video, social media and coupons.

The platform also provides retailers with big shopper data and analytics. Moblty Chief Executive Officer Rajesh Saggi explained that clients have noticed that Moblty has led to “bigger basket size, higher dwell time, greater loyalty club sign-up, and better product navigation and cross-channel support.”

Moblty’s clients include high-profile brands across such sectors as beauty, wine and spirits, hospitality, and airport duty-free shops.

“In a short period of time, global companies have adopted Moblty’s platform ,” Saggi said. “As retail continues to re-invent itself, for the purpose of survival, modernization, and digitization, Moblty is the firm to which businesses are turning.”

He credits the State’s Technology Business Tax Certificate Transfer (NOL) Program with helping his business grow. Administered by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) and the New Jersey Department of Treasury’s Division of Taxation, this competitive program enables eligible technology and biotechnology companies to sell New Jersey tax losses and/or research and development tax credits to raise cash to finance their growth and operations.

Moblty employee Brenna Stuhler showcasing the giant interactive experience built by Moblty for Altice in the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.

“With funding from the NOL Program, we will be able to hire more people, grow our client base and, in turn, help them draw in additional customers,” Saggi said.

Moblty was one of 39 companies approved to share over $46 million through the program in 2017. This is the first time Moblty is participating in the NOL Program. More than 525 businesses have been approved for awards totaling over $950 million since the program was established in 1999.

“We repeatedly hear from participants what a lifeline the NOL Program is for their companies,” EDA President and Chief Operating Officer Tim Lizura said. “We are excited that Moblty has joined the growing list of businesses benefitting from this program.”

@NJEDATech spoke with Saggi about Moblty’s experience in New Jersey and its plans for the future:

Why did you choose to grow your business in New Jersey?
New Jersey has an amazing pool of technology talent that wants to work in the state, and not commute to New York City. We are a beneficiary of that talent. New Jersey also has a great business climate — the State is very pro-business; it has a great investment climate, and it is home to many of our major clients. Also, from our Livingston headquarters, it is just a short commute to New York City.

How has Moblty most benefitted from the NOL Program?
The NOL program has proven itself to be a perfect non-dilutive mechanism to generate additional working capital to run the and grow the business.

What’s on the horizon for Moblty?
Our goal is to develop a global footprint. We have clients who are taking us to Europe and the Middle East, and want us in China “yesterday.”

With Amazon looming, Walmart quietly grows as an advertising force

With around 140 million people shopping at its 5,000 stores in the U.S. every week, Walmart is not just a retail giant. It is also a growing advertising platform that touts its ability to connect online consumer behavior and a mountain of in-store sales data that its biggest rival Amazon lacks.

Walmart wouldn’t provide executives to comment on this story, but conversations with agency executives revealed that Walmart is offering both insertion order-based media buys and programmatic display through Walmart Exchange, a media network the company introduced in 2014. Ad formats include banners, search ads, product listing ads and native ads in the “Sponsored Products” section on Walmart.com. Edward Yruma, managing director for investment bank KeyBanc, called Walmart’s advertising business an “underappreciated growth opportunity.” The company has been serving third-party display ads from other brands more often, rather than just promoting its own product offerings, according to Yruma.

“Ad load on Walmart.com is definitely increasing, and a growing number of our clients are interested to serve ads there,” said John Baker, CMO for agency Mirum. “Brands are interested in retail media because retailers know when people have intent to purchase something. That data is hugely valuable and enables advertisers to stand out from their competitors in e-commerce.”

Jason Goldberg, svp of commerce and content for agency SapientRazorfish, agreed, saying that back in 2014 when Walmart.com represented a small percentage of Walmart’s overall revenue, advertisers paid little attention to Walmart Exchange. But now, as Walmart’s e-commerce business grows and becomes a significant digital player, brands have realized Walmart.com is a lucrative ad vehicle.

Analysts and ad executives think that Walmart Exchange makes sense, as the retailer uses programmatic infrastructure combined with Walmart’s in-store sales data to target ads for brands and manufacturers. Similar to how Amazon buys ad inventory from other publishers, Walmart also buys ad inventory through Walmart Exchange from other demand-side platforms and publishers like YouTube and CBS Interactive and resells it to advertisers, according to agency executives. Those ad placements are cost-efficient and informed by Walmart’s first-party data, they said.

“In-store data is Walmart’s secret sauce,” said Susan Bidel, senior analyst for Forrester Research. “Amazon is Walmart’s biggest competitor, and it owns tremendous data. But Amazon lacks in-store data — the vast majority of commerce still takes place at brick-and-mortar stores today.”

Advertisers can use Walmart’s online and in-store data to exclude or include a specific audience group to come up with a target segment, said Thomas Stelter, vp of emerging solutions for creative agency Possible. For instance, a shoe brand that targets 25- to 40-year-old women with a household income of at least $50,000 a year can exclude people who bought shoes at Walmart over the past six months, so the brand won’t serve ads to this newly shoed group.

Stelter thinks that Walmart Exchange emulates Amazon, which processes data through Amazon’s advertising platform, a DSP owned by its in-house media shop Amazon Media Group, to drive online sales with targeted ads on sites across the web. (We asked Amazon for comment; we’ll update this story if we receive a response.)

He added that while the two retail giants are doing similar targeting, one advantage Amazon has over Walmart is its ability to capture shopping intent in a specific category. For instance, if a person is browsing pet toys and pet food on Amazon without making a purchase, Amazon still knows this person is interested in pet products. “I don’t think Walmart is there yet,” said Stelter.

Amazon is also getting more online search traffic than Walmart is, giving advertisers an incentive to be there so digital shoppers find their products, said Goldberg.

Walmart is not the only supermarket chain that capitalizes on in-store data to carve out a media business. Target, with 1,816 stores in the U.S., has an in-house data-management platform and a private marketplace for its supplier brands to serve targeted programmatic ads.

“Walmart Exchange is very similar to other large retailers getting into the ad business. It’s all about using personal information and purchase history to recognize and target customers on the web and email,” said Mani Gandham, CEO for marketing tech firm Instinctive. “It’s an easy way for [retailers] to make extra money from the data they already have, while helping their own attribution match rates.”

Goldberg thinks that whether Walmart or Amazon will win in the media space is less important because the real competition isn’t just between them — it’s between retailers and the likes of Google and Facebook.

“I think lots of manufacturers will shift their ad dollars from Google and Facebook to retail sites like Amazon and Walmart.com, as big retailers are getting more sophisticated about their online and in-store sales data,” he said.

 

 by Yuyu Chen via Digiday

A Comparative Look at the On Premise (Food and Beverage) and Off Premise

According to Nielsen and Nielsen CGA data, the past 52 weeks (ending June 17, 2017) in the food and beverage industry were characterized by:

  • Continued trading up as premium segments continued to grow faster than the lower price tiers
  • Spirits again in the “growth” lead, slightly faster than Wine, with Beer trailing. Those growth rates have pushed the overall ‘value’ of Spirits in the On Premise to about the same dollar size as Beer.
  • Growth rates have decelerated in the most current quarter – both On Premise and Off Premise – with new forms of shopping and purchasing in part shifting spending (e.g., e-commerce, tasting rooms, festivals/events, etc.)

THE STATE OF ON PREMISE

On Premise growth rates have remained relatively stable throughout the start of 2017 but competition remains fierce. This is an expanding market where supply continues to increase, particularly in the “Eating” channel; however this growth has crossed into “Drinking” channel as well. With overall demand flat, and consumer drinking repertoires continuing to increase, this market is a share battle for most (and especially the more established) suppliers.Scott Elliott, SVP of Nielsen CGA, explains: “Looking for something that cannot be replicated at home, On Premise visitors are seeking out new experiences and outlet styles, with brewpubs, tasting rooms and tiki bars especially popular among younger millennials. Given that On Premise visits continue to be rooted in ‘experience’ rather than a ‘habit,’ it has never been more important for suppliers and retailers to understand, and activate against, specific consumer needs, occasions and repertoires.”Helping the consumer navigate an ever-growing number of choices is vital to ensuring a great experience, to encourage trade-up and to maximize spend per visit. This is where the good suppliers and distributors are beginning to step in. Food-led retailers (in particular, large chains) need help in developing more compelling beverage alcohol programs. Independent outlets, on the other hand, need support in driving traffic and in targeting specific consumer occasions.Elliott continued, “Now that the insights and tools are finally available, suppliers hoping to win in the On Premise must be able to act with a similar level of sophistication around category management, assortment and pricing strategy that has been common in Off Premise channels for so long. In a market where everyone is fighting for share, we believe that better data-driven strategies are the only way to grow in a consistent and controlled manner.”THE STATE OF OFF PREMISEOff Premise growth rates, while still outperforming On Premise, are decelerating, with economic factors and channel shifting impacting consumer and shopper behavior. E-commerce in general might be exerting its influence in two ways.According to Danny Brager, SVP of Beverage Alcohol at Nielsen, “E-commerce may be impacting Beverage Alcohol in the traditional Off Premise channel in a couple of different ways. One is online purchasing of alcohol increasingly taking the place of traditional store purchasing. The other is the indirect impact of less store trips impacting more discretionary categories, like adult beverages, where a significant percentage of purchasing has traditionally been impulse driven (i.e not planned).”What happens to those impulse purchases if consumers are in stores less often to do their shopping? In addition, some mainstream retailers that sell alcohol in their stores are still not at the point of offering those products via their online platforms – further negatively impacting category sales.Brager continued, “E-commerce in beverage alcohol, while still relatively small in comparison to many other categories, will continue to expand. Off Premise retailers will need to deal with a growing segment of consumers who may wish to ‘buy,’ but who may not need or see the need to visit the store to do so.”CATEGORY INSIGHTS*52 weeks ending 6-17-2017BEERDomestic vs. Import: While overall category sales are challenged in both channels, growth rates are under even more pressure in traditional On Premise (restaurant and bars). For instance, Mexican and Belgium imports are growing at double digit growth rates Off Premise, but only up single digits On Premise, while moderate declines of Domestic Premium Beers Off Premise are much further exacerbated On Premise.  Craft: While Craft growth rates have decelerated sharply in both channels over the past year, Craft is still about 2.5x better developed (dollar share) in On Premise than in the aggregate of the various Nielsen-measured Off Premise channels.Ciders: Ciders have reached almost a 2.0% share of the Beer plus Flavored Malt Beverage plus Cider category On Premise, vs its 1.3% share Off Premise.WINESparkling: Wine growth rates in the last quarter lessened in both Off and On Premise channels. While that is true for the overall category, an exception is Sparkling Wine, whose impressive growth in On Premise channels in the latest quarter held quite firm.Rosé: Rosé continues to be a big growth story within the wine category – and while it’s growing well On Premise, it’s the Off Premise where the growth rates have been ‘out of this world.’ This is unusual in that while On Premise usually sets the new trends and then Off Premise stores follow, it seems to be the other way around for this dynamic product segment.Imports: Imports overall are better developed On Premise. Some countries, namely Spain, South Africa and Portugal, are performing better in On Premise channels, while others like Italy and New Zealand are trending better in Off Premise.   SPIRITSGrowth Categories: There are considerable similarities between growth leaders in both channels; Cognac is by far out in front of all other segments, followed by Irish Whiskey, and Tequila. Of those three categories, Tequila and Irish Whiskey are better developed Spirit segments in the On Premise, while Cognac is better developed in the Off Premise.Flavors: On the other hand, while Whiskey flavors in aggregate are equally well developed as a share of Whiskey in both channels, their growth rates in On Premise lag Off Premise by a considerable margin.A couple of other Spirit segments:: Rums and Cordials overall continue to struggle in both channels, while Gin is performing better in the On Premise than Off Premise both in overall share and growth.

THE STATE OF OFF PREMISE

Off Premise growth rates, while still outperforming On Premise, are decelerating, with economic factors and channel shifting impacting consumer and shopper behavior. E-commerce in general might be exerting its influence in two ways.According to Danny Brager, SVP of Beverage Alcohol at Nielsen, “E-commerce may be impacting Beverage Alcohol in the traditional Off Premise channel in a couple of different ways. One is online purchasing of alcohol increasingly taking the place of traditional store purchasing. The other is the indirect impact of less store trips impacting more discretionary categories, like adult beverages, where a significant percentage of purchasing has traditionally been impulse driven (i.e not planned).”What happens to those impulse purchases if consumers are in stores less often to do their shopping? In addition, some mainstream retailers that sell alcohol in their stores are still not at the point of offering those products via their online platforms – further negatively impacting category sales.Brager continued, “E-commerce in beverage alcohol, while still relatively small in comparison to many other categories, will continue to expand. Off Premise retailers will need to deal with a growing segment of consumers who may wish to ‘buy,’ but who may not need or see the need to visit the store to do so.”CATEGORY INSIGHTS*52 weeks ending 6-17-2017BEERDomestic vs. Import: While overall category sales are challenged in both channels, growth rates are under even more pressure in traditional On Premise (restaurant and bars). For instance, Mexican and Belgium imports are growing at double digit growth rates Off Premise, but only up single digits On Premise, while moderate declines of Domestic Premium Beers Off Premise are much further exacerbated On Premise.  Craft: While Craft growth rates have decelerated sharply in both channels over the past year, Craft is still about 2.5x better developed (dollar share) in On Premise than in the aggregate of the various Nielsen-measured Off Premise channels.Ciders: Ciders have reached almost a 2.0% share of the Beer plus Flavored Malt Beverage plus Cider category On Premise, vs its 1.3% share Off Premise.WINESparkling: Wine growth rates in the last quarter lessened in both Off and On Premise channels. While that is true for the overall category, an exception is Sparkling Wine, whose impressive growth in On Premise channels in the latest quarter held quite firm.Rosé: Rosé continues to be a big growth story within the wine category – and while it’s growing well On Premise, it’s the Off Premise where the growth rates have been ‘out of this world.’ This is unusual in that while On Premise usually sets the new trends and then Off Premise stores follow, it seems to be the other way around for this dynamic product segment.Imports: Imports overall are better developed On Premise. Some countries, namely Spain, South Africa and Portugal, are performing better in On Premise channels, while others like Italy and New Zealand are trending better in Off Premise.   SPIRITSGrowth Categories: There are considerable similarities between growth leaders in both channels; Cognac is by far out in front of all other segments, followed by Irish Whiskey, and Tequila. Of those three categories, Tequila and Irish Whiskey are better developed Spirit segments in the On Premise, while Cognac is better developed in the Off Premise.Flavors: On the other hand, while Whiskey flavors in aggregate are equally well developed as a share of Whiskey in both channels, their growth rates in On Premise lag Off Premise by a considerable margin.A couple of other Spirit segments:: Rums and Cordials overall continue to struggle in both channels, while Gin is performing better in the On Premise than Off Premise both in overall share and growth.
Off Premise growth rates, while still outperforming On Premise, are decelerating, with economic factors and channel shifting impacting consumer and shopper behavior. E-commerce in general might be exerting its influence in two ways.According to Danny Brager, SVP of Beverage Alcohol at Nielsen, “E-commerce may be impacting Beverage Alcohol in the traditional Off Premise channel in a couple of different ways. One is online purchasing of alcohol increasingly taking the place of traditional store purchasing. The other is the indirect impact of less store trips impacting more discretionary categories, like adult beverages, where a significant percentage of purchasing has traditionally been impulse driven (i.e not planned).”What happens to those impulse purchases if consumers are in stores less often to do their shopping? In addition, some mainstream retailers that sell alcohol in their stores are still not at the point of offering those products via their online platforms – further negatively impacting category sales.Brager continued, “E-commerce in beverage alcohol, while still relatively small in comparison to many other categories, will continue to expand. Off Premise retailers will need to deal with a growing segment of consumers who may wish to ‘buy,’ but who may not need or see the need to visit the store to do so.”CATEGORY INSIGHTS*52 weeks ending 6-17-2017

BEER

Domestic vs. Import: While overall category sales are challenged in both channels, growth rates are under even more pressure in traditional On Premise (restaurant and bars). For instance, Mexican and Belgium imports are growing at double digit growth rates Off Premise, but only up single digits On Premise, while moderate declines of Domestic Premium Beers Off Premise are much further exacerbated On Premise.  Craft: While Craft growth rates have decelerated sharply in both channels over the past year, Craft is still about 2.5x better developed (dollar share) in On Premise than in the aggregate of the various Nielsen-measured Off Premise channels.Ciders: Ciders have reached almost a 2.0% share of the Beer plus Flavored Malt Beverage plus Cider category On Premise, vs its 1.3% share Off Premise.

WINES

parkling: Wine growth rates in the last quarter lessened in both Off and On Premise channels. While that is true for the overall category, an exception is Sparkling Wine, whose impressive growth in On Premise channels in the latest quarter held quite firm.Rosé: Rosé continues to be a big growth story within the wine category – and while it’s growing well On Premise, it’s the Off Premise where the growth rates have been ‘out of this world.’ This is unusual in that while On Premise usually sets the new trends and then Off Premise stores follow, it seems to be the other way around for this dynamic product segment.Imports: Imports overall are better developed On Premise. Some countries, namely Spain, South Africa and Portugal, are performing better in On Premise channels, while others like Italy and New Zealand are trending better in Off Premise.

SPIRITS

Growth Categories: There are considerable similarities between growth leaders in both channels; Cognac is by far out in front of all other segments, followed by Irish Whiskey, and Tequila. Of those three categories, Tequila and Irish Whiskey are better developed Spirit segments in the On Premise, while Cognac is better developed in the Off Premise.Flavors: On the other hand, while Whiskey flavors in aggregate are equally well developed as a share of Whiskey in both channels, their growth rates in On Premise lag Off Premise by a considerable margin.A couple of other Spirit segments:: Rums and Cordials overall continue to struggle in both channels, while Gin is performing better in the On Premise than Off Premise both in overall share and growth.

Source: Nielsen

August 14, 2017

Whisky, tequila and gin to drive global spirits category growth to 2021

Just released data from the IWSR 2017-2021 Forecast suggests global volumes of whisky, gin and tequila are expected to make gains of 55.2m, 7.1m and 5.8m nine-litre cases respectively over the next five years, following their rapid growth in 2016. These categories together with baijiu (+48.2m cases between 2016 and 2021), will contribute the most in the overall total global spirits category growth, which is expected to reach 3.19bn cases by 2021.

Consumption of local whiskies in India continues to thrive; Scotch in India is also forecast to continue to be one of the largest growth segments. Globally, Scotch is forecast to contribute +10.5m cases to whisky growth over the next five years and US whiskies a further +8.9m cases. Other whiskies (predominantly Indian Whiskies) will be the largest contributor growing by +28.2m cases. The US is the second-largest growth market for whisky behind India, forecasting the strongest gains for US and Irish whiskey.

Tequila will also make its largest gains on the US market, with additional growth forecast in its domestic market, Mexico.

Despite being a top growth market for many categories, the total US alcohol market is forecast to decline by 37m cases over the next five years. The forecasted growth in wine, whisky and tequila is not enough to offset declines in beer, cider and mixed drinks.

Gin’s domestic market, the UK, has led the way for the gin revival. The huge range of brands now available on the UK market (likely to be over 700) offers plenty of room for consumers to experiment. The UK gin market is forecast to gain an additional 1.4m cases by 2021. Similar growth is expected in Spain and the US.

Baijiu is forecast to see the largest growth all of spirits categories over the next five years, benefiting from a growing economy in China and increased demand for business banquets.

 

Beer and wine* are forecast to gain the largest volumes in the overall alcohol market over the next five years, adding 139m and 76.5m cases respectively. The IWSR forecasts the strongest growth for beer in Mexico, India and Vietnam.

China and the US will see the largest growth in wine consumption over the next five years, with both local and imported wines winning over consumers.

The IWSR is widely seen as the most authoritative data source on the beverage alcohol market. The IWSR’s unique approach to forecasting has proven to be reliable. Comparing last year’s forecast for 2016 with actual 2016 data, the IWSR’s forecast at a global level differed by just -0.5% for wine and by just +0.3% for all spirits.

Source: IWSR
August 14th